New heart imaging test identifies improved outcomes in patients with amyloidosis

Focusing on a different way of reading a standard ultrasound test, researchers at Boston Medical Center report that they can determine whether cardiac amyloidosis patients are expected to survive after a stem cell transplant. BMC's press release states:

"Researchers at Boston Medical Center (BMC) have reported that a new heart imaging test can determine whether cardiac amyloidosis patients are expected to survive after a stem cell transplant. They accomplished this by analyzing the results of an echocardiogram--a standard ultrasound test that assesses the heart's functionality. The findings, published in the European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, may change the way doctors predict who will benefit from stem cell transplants in this disease.

Frederick L. Ruberg, MD, director of advanced cardiac imaging at BMC and associate professor of medicine and radiology at BUSM and his team, including Francesco Salinaro, MD, the paper's first author and a visiting scientist from Italy, evaluated the echocardiograms of over 60 cardiac AL amyloidosis patients to determine if a new measure, called a longitudinal strain, would be predictive of survival at one year after stem cell transplantation. They found that strain not only predicted survival, but outperformed other conventionally measured biomarkers found in the blood."

h/t to DOTmed

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